Last Saturday, the SRC —usually one of Rose’s few math-free places—was swarmed by 196 middle school students for the state MATHCOUNTS competition. The competition brings together some of the best mathematics students in the state; Rose-Hulman rewards a select few of those students with scholarships. This year saw one of the biggest Indiana MATHCOUNTS in recent memory, according to Dr. Elton Graves, Rose-Hulman’s MATHCOUNTS organizer. Two lucky students received $10,000 scholarships from Rose Hulman: Mark Selke of Klondike Middle School and Claudia Huang of Sycamore School; those individuals received the scholarship for having the top individual scores. An additional four students received smaller scholarships.

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FCC releases national broadband plan

 
The first tangible results of Congress’ mandate were released Tuesday in the Federal Communication Commission’s national broadband plan. The main ‘headline-grabber’ in the plan is the goal of giving 100 million U.S. households 100 megabits (around 12.5 megabytes) per second by 2020, as well as extending 1 gigabit per second broadband to community sites like schools and government buildings. In addition, the plan will shift wireless spectrum from broadcast television to wireless companies, which will allow cell providers like AT&T more room to supply data-hungry smartphones. The main questions surrounding the plan at the moment concern how to pay for it, with estimates ranging from $12bn to $25bn, though the FCC intends to pay for some of that with the proceeds from wireless spectrum auctions.

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This past Saturday, Girl Scouts from all around Indiana visited Rose-Hulman to take part in the biannual Girl Scout Engineering Patch Day, which is hosted by the Society of Women Engineers (SWE), and features a presentation by Alpha Chi Sigma, the professional chemistry fraternity.

Stations at
Girl Scout Day
At each station, the Scouts are asked what each major does, and then more information is given about the particular major (what they do/with which products they work).
•Chemical Engineering — Make ice cream
Biomedical Engineering — Extract DNA from fruit
•Electrical Engineering — Connect a circuit, and make a light bulb light up
•Civil Engineering — Build bridges out of books, and see which is strongest
•Mechanical Engineering — Build cars that are propelled by blown-up balloons, and see which is fastest


Around fifty Girl Scouts took part in the event this year, accompanied by their parents, troop leaders, and siblings.
“The main reason SWE holds this event is to get the girls interested in science and technology,” SWE Secretary Jenn Fischer, senior chemical engineering major, said. The event lets the Girl Scouts learn more about science and technology, and they can “earn an actual Girl Scout patch,” said Fischer.

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I think we’ve all been there before: Disney revisiting the Lewis Carroll’s series of stories concerning Alice, Johnny Depp being attached to a huge budget motion picture, an all star cast of voice actors playing some of the more ridiculous characters of literary and, to a point, movie history. This set-up seems like nothing could go wrong; there’s no way this couldn’t sell seats, especially with the added dimension of 3-D, a feature that made “Avatar” the success it has been. So why is it that this iteration of “Alice in Wonderland,” that had everything going for it, left me wanting so much more?

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Recently at the 82nd Academy Awards “The Hurt Locker hauled in a whopping 6 awards including Best Picture and Best Director (Kathryn Bigelow), and for good reason. The film follows a team of three soldier from an Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) squad as they carry out they carry out their service. Within the first 10 minutes of the movie, the squad’s leader, Sergeant Thompson (Guy Pearce, “Memento”) is killed in a failed bomb defusing mission. This scene sets up the atmosphere for the rest of the movie: anything can go wrong at any moment. Sergeant Thompson is soon replaced by the reckless, yet effective, Sergeant William James (Jeremy Renner, “28 Weeks Later”). Renner brilliantly portrays a man who is addicted to the thrill and suspense of war; he is also really good at what he does. In one memorable scene Thompson, faced with disarming a trunk full of explosives, strips down from his bomb suit and claims “If I’m going to die, I’m going die comfortable.” In another scene he leads the other two team members, Sergeant J.T. Sanborn (Anthony Mackie, “Million Dollar Baby”) and Specialist Owen Eldridge (Brian Geraghty, “We Are Marshall”), to kill two insurgents even though he received no orders to do so. Thompson’s reckless behavior eventually lead to him and his squad member being caught in seriously dangerous situations.

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More than 12 years after the success of Mezzanine, Massive Attack have re-emerged once again with Heligoland. The album steers away from the trop-hop and dance club scene, using a much more minimalist approach, resulting in an organic sound never before heard on any of their previous albums.


In a move away from techno loops and polished drum machine beats, Massive Attack have opted instead for live percussion, haunting acoustic guitars, and electronic beats that supplement, rather than overpower, the album’s ten tracks. The choice of guest vocalists also speaks of the new direction of Massive Attack, with appearances by Damon Albarn (Gorillaz and Blur), Guy Garvey (Elbow), Tunde Adebimpe (TV on the Radio), and others.

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