Most Rose-Hulman students haven’t ridden a bicycle with training wheels in years, but they sure know how to put one together.


Over 250 students convened Saturday, December 12 to assemble bicycles for needy children throughout Indiana. The event, now in its tenth year, began at 8:00 a.m. in the Facilities Operations building and concluded at 3:00 p.m. with the distribution of bicycles to charity organizations and individuals.

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The Study Abroad Symposium was held on Thursday, December 10. The programs ranged from the more traditional or frequent choices, such as Germany, to the newer, more unconventional destinations such as Hungary.


The advisors of the programs talked about the requirements of each one and how to apply, although several professors who weren’t the heads of various programs discussed individual countries to encourage students to consider going to those countries as well as the ones that had more widely known programs. Also present were students who also discussed their individual experiences with various study abroad programs.

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Copenhagen in chaos


The Copenhagen Conference (once hailed as the new Kyoto) has run into serious problems as various groups, pursuing their own agendas, have created a chasm between rich and poor nations. The main points of contention are numbers: emissions cuts by, and funding from, rich nations are not at the levels desired by poorer nations. National leaders are scheduled to arrive Thursday, but some have questioned as to whether they will attend at all if their interests are not represented beforehand at the conference. One thing is certain: people are interested. 46,000 people registered to view the deliberations, which will occur in a building that can only hold 15,000.

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Matt Branam, former interim president, has been elected permanent president of Rose-Hulman by the Board of Trustees on December 4, 2009. The Presidential Search Committee worked for several months to find possible candidates for the position, but it eventually became clear that Branam was the right choice. Board of Trustees Chairman William Fenoglio notes that, “Early in that process, the Trustees became convinced that it was in the institution’s best interest to ask [Branam] to become our permanent president.”

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On November 7th, 2007, Activision released the first of its “Call of Duty” series, which stepped off the stage of World War II combat and focused on modern warfare (hence the name “Modern Warfare,” also known as “Call of Duty 4”).


The first-person shooter, set in Russia and the Middle East, was quickly hailed as one of the greatest of its kind, with more than 13 million copies sold to date. Two years later, Activision released the sequel, “Modern Warfare 2.”

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If you’re like me, you’ve said you wanted to kill someone; we’ve all had that urge to put a knife in someone’s back either figuratively or literally. Well, instead of actually doing the deed and having to deal with the lawsuit, red tape, and the constant
looking over my shoulder, I turn to my trusty Playstation. I was feeling especially bloodthirsty over break, so I played “Assassin’s Creed 2.” Now, having played “Assassin’s Creed,” I can safely say that Ubisoft has listened to its fans and read
the notes in their complaint box. Issues such as repetitive gameplay, uneven pacing, uninteresting characters, boring combat, and faulty AI have all been addressed. It’s as though Ubisoft said, “Everyone! The ideas these fanboys are talking about actually make sense. It’s not just a bunch of swears and lolcats.” So with more missions, more mission types, a better story, more ways to kill, more ways to blend in and hide, and money to buy art, weapons, and armor, “Assassin’s Creed 2” is a definite buy.

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